Peers & Heirs

There is no doubt now that Ron Paul has sparked a Second American Revolution. Through the man and the message, his campaign has awakened a whole new generation, as Ronald Reagan, Barry Goldwater, Calvin Coolidge, Lysander Spooner, Thomas Jefferson, Samuel Adams and Thomas Paine had before him.

While most libertarians are rightfully fixated on the drama of the primaries as they unfold (and, underreported, Dr. Paul takes his place among the top contenders), another critical question after, “will Paul win?” is “who will carry the torch forward?” Dr. Paul is in a class by himself, distinguished by his ability to unravel years of deceit and public education through oratory, and all in a way that is not threatening or even angry. He is a guru, a saint, a Ghandi, a Jesus, a humble steward of honest ideals in a cynical and waning empire. He is not perfect nor superhuman, but neither were Ghandi nor Jesus. He, like them, is good and effective – and that is worthy of high praise. But he has no heirs, and no peers that have breached the wall of mainstream recognition. And that is a problem.

There are potential peers. John Stossel is a great communicator and seems more committed to the cause with each passing day. Michael Badnarik may be nerdy, but having met him I can attest to his interpersonal charisma and intellect. The former Governor of New Mexico, Gary Johnson, just endorsed Dr. Paul, but he is himself a successful libertarian politician.

These examples do not change the fact that other political movements have tons of brand-name politicians pressing their causes, and that those innately attracted to freedom philosophies tend to also be socially-awkward young caucasian males. I can’t explain it, and I’m not going to try. I don’t think it’s a rule, as history’s greatest liberators are a demographically diverse group (Frederick Douglass, Mohandas Ghandi, Margaret Thatcher, et al). Until recently, libertarians had eggs but no basket. Ron Paul is our first basket. But, as the saying goes, you shouldn’t keep all your eggs in one basket. A variety of freedom-oriented candidates, such as those that Dr. Paul tried to nurture through the Republican Liberty Caucus, would give this new revolution staying power.

Heirs are a different issue. Is Dr. Paul training some young minds to carry his life’s work forward? If you chance to read this, Doc, I hope you will consider the notion. I would jump at the chance to learn how to run a professional, principled campaign and win. If this campaign meets its end without a nomination, many young and free souls would want Dr. Paul to start a school to pass on a career worth of knowledge – and up the number of congressional libertarians from one to a majority. If the man himself is not making such preparations, is anyone else taking notes?

This campaign proves something to generations of self-doubting libertarians: it can be done. We are often our own worst enemy, whether it’s because we don’t have the courage of our convictions (Jason Sorens, the genius behind the Free State Project, is now teaching at a public university) or we have succumbed to a culture of victimhood (“the slow growth of the federal state is inevitable”) or we expend our energies vigorously debating minor philosophical discrepancies rather than promoting our shared visions to others (this is the story behind most libertarian functions I have attended). Every movement takes generations to gain recognition, and most aren’t even worth recognizing. Ron Paul reminds us that we are not lunatics on the fringe. Our message is pure and true; the evidence is there to see every day. Our message is the same as it was in 1776; Jefferson told us that it would require periodic revolution to maintain liberty in the face of the more destructive impulses of human nature. Our message is relatable, communicatable, and as the Paulites love to say: Freedom is popular. It’s important that we never forget, and that the irrepressible Dr. No has plenty of peers and heirs to remind us.

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4 thoughts on “Peers & Heirs

  1. Very interesting.

    I actually do not enjoy complaining about situations, but do so becuase I don’t have the energy to solve them all.

    So, I love to see this kind of response. I fully endorse this Paul Congress project, with the reservation that I don’t think Constitution Party candidates are as true to libertarian ideals as they appear. I think most are religious zealots in a sphere (governance) which must be kept secular.

    Feel free to retort…

  2. Jason Sorens has not devoted himself to the public university. It’s a stepping stone. How about you? Do you have a state-issued driver’s license? Do you drive on public interstates, roads, highways or waterways? Do you pay taxes to the IRS? If so to any or all, and if you insist on purity from others, then you, my friend, are a compromiser and unworthy of “the movedment.” I say, Do Not Judge, Lest You Be Judged. I also say, any good hand in the freedom movement is a good hand and nothing else is required. Any contribution — great or small, “compromised” or “pure” — is another straw on the communist back.

  3. Bryan,

    Fair enough. I agree, and retract my criticism. The statists have created a world where one cannot live a normal life without playing their game. What’s important is that your heart is in the right place and you do what you can, when you can, for freedom.

    That said, I think many libertarians fall down a slippery slope of justifying pretty much everything. Not speaking of Dr. Sorens, who has done more than his share for freedom in America, we all have to make choices about where our priorities lie. Libertarians, more than members of other movements, seem to surrender to a life in the cradle of the ‘authorities.’ I often ask myself, and you all should too, what have I done to further my movement recently?

    My most recent was a donation to the Ron Paul campaign. I think Dr. Sorens’ is well known, and I hope he continues to light the fires of liberty among his students – even at a public university. I just hope he chose to teach there because of some pressing necessity, and not because getting a place at the government trough is an easier or safer route.

    With Respect,
    Mike

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